February is American Heart Month!  

This annual event began under the President Lyndon B. Johnson administration in 1964 to raise awareness on the importance of heart health.

At the time of the Johnson administration, more than half of U.S. deaths were caused by cardiovascular disease, with little known information on ways to reduce risks for heart disease. 

American Heart Month is the reminder everyone needs to take active steps to live a heart-healthy lifestyle.

Here are a few tips on how you can get started on your journey toward a healthy heart!

Know and Control Your Cholesterol Levels

You can’t know you’re at risk if you never get checked.  Symptoms of high blood pressure and cholesterol usually go unnoticed and left untreated.

In order to know your levels, you should have regular blood pressure screenings at least once a year, or with every medical visit.  Getting a blood pressure screening can give insight whether you’re at risk and guide you toward a healthier lifestyle.

Stay Active

The treadmill and the elliptical can seem like daunting machines at the gym, but regular exercise not only makes you look good, it helps you feel good too!  Daily physical activity, at least 30 minutes of vigorous cardio, can lower your risk for heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

Eat Healthier

Have you ever noticed that you feel sluggish after indulging in greasy foods?  Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose (blood sugar) that our bodies use for energy.  

If you find yourself frequently skipping nourishing foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, and indulging in foods high in sodium and fat, your body is missing out on what it needs to thrive and fight disease.    

Don’t Smoke

Smoking is a habit known for the damage it can cause to your overall health.  Smoking increases your chances of being affected by heart disease, so do your heart some justice and quit.  

Keep your heart in good health with these tips!  If you would like more information about American Heart Month, please visit the American Heart Association’s website.

At our urgent care center, we treat patients who are symptomatic of high blood pressure with our state-of-the-art lab and digital x-ray system.  We will also refer you to your primary care physician or a specialist for further evaluation at the conclusion of your visit.  

For more information on the services we provide, please call us at 908-222-3500.